THE PROCESS OF MAKING MAPLE SYRUP

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TAPPING

After the new year begins, when temperatures are right, a small hole is drilled into the tree. A tap is inserted and it is connected to t tubing that will eventually bring the sap to the sugarhouse.

THE RUN

When temperatures rise above freezing during the day, but remain below freezing at night, sugaring season beings!

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CONCENTRATION

The sap is pulled through the tubing using a vacuum system, which does not harm the trees. Once enough is collected, it is processed through an RO (reverse osmosis) machine. This helps concentrate the sap by removing pure water.

Raw sap contains only 1-4% sugar. After concentration with the RO, the sugar content can be increased up to 20%.

 
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BOILING

The concentrated sap is then brought into our wood-fired evaporator. Water evaporates from the sap, continuing to concentrate the sugar as it boils.

THE PRODUCT

Once the sap reaches a concentration of 66% sugar, it is official maple syrup!

It is drawn off the evaporator and diatomaceous earth, also known as filter aid, is added. This binds to any unwanted minerals and impurities. Using a filter press, the filter aid and waste are then removed. This leaves a clear, clean, pure product.

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ABOUT MAPLE

Maple syrup contains a large amount of essential minerals and antioxidants, along with the lowest calorie count of any natural sugar. There are many uses for syrup beyond the typical pancake and waffle topping. Try some in your morning coffee